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"At every level, physical, subtle and causal, there are invisible patterns of unity and oneness interconnecting all the worlds."
 - Hans Jenny

Field Studies is an ongoing series of ink paintings that have emerged from previous Zen practice. This work continues the explorations that began in the series Out of Stillness as I am investigating the emergence of pattern within the seeming random (this is known as ergodic theory).

My brush gestures create circles that continually repeat, with no erasure or measurement. As I paint, my body follows the rhythm of my breath, activating the brush on each exhale. Mutations in the series are created by changes in brush width, ink density, and the type of paper used. When the order of the circles is allowed to be determined by these and other environmental variants, the 'fields’ become spontaneous and the variations appear as random. Through these concentrated and repeated gestures, patterns of surprising ambiguity emerge.
 

"Out of life comes death,
and out of death, life.

Out of the young, the old,
and out of the old, the young.

Out of waking, sleep,
and out of sleep, waking.

The stream of creation and dissolution
never stops."

— Heraclitus in The Circle of Life

Repetitions in this series have to do with attention placed, and placed again, on ink applied to paper. Consistently following the breath, finding stability within the exhale. Placing attention is a method for opening the larger context of internal spaciousness. In this way painting becomes a method of meditation. 

Through attention to the small details and variations in this series the viewer can become absorbed, and relish being transported to a spacious universe of infinite possibility.
 

This series is an acknowledgment of the universal continuum of caring and courage.
 
Once during a teaching the Dalai Lama said “don’t forget the endless caring that supports our world. Remember please the mouths that are filled, the bodies that are washed, the compassion that constantly happens even among animals as they nurture their young. It sustains our world.” He also asked us to recall the fearless acts of selfless bravery people demonstrate in the face of emergency.

The work honours the unsung women and men who are forgotten by history. Although their names are unknown to us they leave a profound legacy of great benefit. Each piece in the series is a flag or a banner, an acknowledgment of their contributions.


 

"We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward, or fix us in the present. We are made up of layers, cells, constellations."
 - Anais Nin

Perhaps our ecological crisis arises from our incompleteness? We seem unable  to exercise our potential? We remain unaware of our indivisible connection to the earth and each other.

This series is about this inability of humans to coherently occupy the environment and see ourselves as one more mammal in the Eco System. The land-use maps have been submerged in circles, symbols of continuous human activity and our overwhelming presence on the planet.

These pieces record a cognitive dissonance...our determined destruction of what is most precious to us.
 

The ensō symbolizes absolute enlightenment, strength, elegance, the universe, and mu (the void). Usually, a person draws the ensō in one fluid, expressive stroke. When drawn according to the sōsho (草書) style of Japanese calligraphy, the brushstroke is especially swift.

This series is derived from the the techniques and experiences gained from ‘Field Studies’ and ‘Out of Stillness’. Here the viewer can be absorbed and transported to a spacious universe of infinite possibility. I wish to bring attention to the strength and beauty of the circle from Paleolithic beginnings to predominance in contemporary art and design.

The elements are combined to create visual metaphors related to the psyche.

The enchantment that painting presents and the integrity of this experience can prove what is imagined, when looking at art, is as real as any other experience that creates our world.
 

This series explores evolving weather patterns and the grandeur of landforms as captured by satellite imagery. The paintings bring attention to the perpetual movement of erupting islands and shifting land masses as climate change is recorded.

Here, deeply textured surfaces mimic microscopic and macroscopic perspectives as they coincide.

The tradition of cartography is considered as a way we commodify and abstract nature and the divided segments indicate the imposed nature of national borders. These boundaries are often bands of gold leaf encapsulating lakes and rivers symbolizing water as a precious, and contentious, commodity.

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